Robert Estrin - piano expert
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How to play piano faster

Step-by-step instructions to master the art of playing fast

Released on October 9, 2013

  
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Ross Parsai * VSM MEMBER * on October 16, 2013 @8:20 am PST
Robert, you are simply fantastic! I find your teaching method so easy to follow and I spend time practicing exactly as you suggest. Just want to let you know, it works and it is wonderful!

Many thanks, Ross
ACM on October 10, 2013 @8:05 am PST
I thought this was good information put simply enough that even a new player could understand and relate to. I find that in addition to a desire to learn to play faster I am still reading the music very slowly and this also impedes playing faster .Any suggestions?Or is the answer to this to try and memorize music so I don't have to rely as much on fast reading
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Robert Estrin - host, on October 10, 2013 @11:33 am PST
When playing classical, solo piano music, it is much easier to play fluently when the music is memorized. Even when playing chamber music or accompanying, you must be so familiar with the score that you don't have to look at the music all the time. Here is a video I produced on how to memorize:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QeDEI0dGW_w
LUIS MARTINEZ * VSM MEMBER * on October 9, 2013 @10:32 am PST
VERY INFORMATIVE AND ENTERTAINING AS WELL. I WILL BE LOOKING FORWARD TO MANY MORE PROGRAMS IN THE FUTURE,KEEP UP THE SHOW,WELL DONE.
Robert Estrin - host, on October 9, 2013 @9:58 am PST
Thank you for your valuable suggestions! Yes, practicing with different rhythms and accents can sometimes help in increasing tempo. As you gain speed, you can group larger and larger sections of notes. Sometimes it's just knowing what note to stop on! If you get stuck trying to increase tempo, experimenting with various techniques can aid in increasing facility.
John Tiffin on October 9, 2013 @5:30 am PST
Thank you for your invaluable hints. On your 'playing fast' video there might be an additional technique to explore - the addition of patterns of long and short notes in twos and threes to promote even-ness in the exercise of the fast parts. For example: 1/4-1/8-1/8, then reverse:!/8-1/8-1/4 through the course of the run. Add accents on individual notes to increase strength on the fingers that need it. In passages with a 6/8 time signature, it can be exercised by setting the metronome to beat 2, then 3 times a measure (Chopin prelude in Gmin) and increasing the tempo by degrees.
Helena boggia on October 9, 2013 @4:59 am PST
Brilliant Robert , as usual. My main problem is, we'll one of them and that is finding the chords quick enough. Is there any technique you could recommend. It soon slows me down. Thank you and please keep your vids coming
Helena boggia on October 9, 2013 @4:59 am PST
Brilliant Robert , as usual. My main problem is, we'll one of them and that is finding the chords quick enough. Is there any technique you could recommend. It soon slows me down. Thank you and please keep your vids coming
Alfred shorter jr on September 11, 2013 @12:24 pm PST
How do you keep students interested in what they are learning from reading sheet music.?
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Robert - host, on September 13, 2013 @12:23 pm PST
There are different ways to engage students in music. Allowing them to sightread popular music of their choice is a great way for them to feel motivated. Beyond that, helping students perfect their musical performances brings confidence and joy. So, choosing music that is on the right level is critical in keeping up their interest.
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