William Fitzpatrick - advanced violin expert
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What's the difference between Sautille and Spiccato, and other bow strokes?

How to master two of the most important violin bow strokes

Released on January 1, 2014

  
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Comments/Questions/Requests:

seamas on July 30, 2014 @7:58 am PST
This is fascinating. Have you ever discussed the comparison of articulation and expressive techniques with a wind player? I am a recorder player seeking to extend my technique onward in time from the baroque by using ( in part) the violin 1 lines from Mozart symphonies starting at #1 and going 'on' from there. I would appreciate any comment you may care to make. Kind regards seamas.
popi * VSM MEMBER * on April 2, 2014 @4:24 am PST
Hi,
I think this light sautille is applicable for all of Beethoven sonatas..?As far as I played..ex the Rondo final of the G Major sonate..is sautille the bov stroke...isn't it?
Regarding Romantic sonates, such as faure n1 in A M, for the scherzo mouvement I use sautille but not as you show here..my bow leaves the string but very little..Others I regarded use even spiccato I think..but is very fast for a spiccato...!
Thank you for the video Professor
Regards,
Popi
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William - host, on April 3, 2014 @11:14 am PST
Thanks for your support!
Dennis Bogden * VSM MEMBER * on February 28, 2014 @11:30 am PST
How to finger and practice flight of the bumblebee
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William - host, on April 3, 2014 @11:14 am PST
As there are many chromatics it would be too wordy to say this here but will put it on my list of videos to make...
Diler on February 15, 2014 @3:33 am PST
Hi professor,
Just would like to thanks you very much for those grate demonstration about bowing technics and using 2&3 also 1&3 finger presure to improve bowing scale but I would like to know how do we need to use a Pinky finger and what mostly we used it for or whet is it major duty! Is just likeostly balancing also who's about the bow angels position on the strings when need to play ff or pp!
Thanks again and that's the best bowing lesson I have ever watched, sorry if my massage is too long. Hope also it make sense
Thanks so much and wish you have a grate day,
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William - host, on February 27, 2014 @2:47 pm PST
Thanks!!!
Charlie Corbin * VSM MEMBER * on January 22, 2014 @9:01 am PST
Enjoyed your explanations. I'm 80, started trying to play at 72. I've never figured out how to reliably use vibrato. Any thoughts to get me going would be much appreciated. Perhaps you already have a video on that?
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Linda Reinhart on February 26, 2014 @12:08 pm PST
Did you get a reply to this? I, also, resumed playing in my early 70s and found my vibrato missing. I have tried various instructors' methods, but have only had success with "finger vibrato", which I am finding (with usage) is gradually moving into my hand and arm.
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William - host, on February 26, 2014 @8:24 pm PST
Hi! I missed this entirely! Sorry! The next series will begin a discussion on this question.
Linda Reinhart on February 27, 2014 @11:37 am PST
Oh, good. In talking to others who have started or resumed playing as elders, I find the muscles for vibrato are sadly unresponsive.
Charlie Corbin * VSM MEMBER * on February 26, 2014 @3:26 pm PST
No, Linda. I haven't received a reply. Sorry.
Charlie
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Fabrizio Ferrari - moderator and CEO, on February 26, 2014 @4:19 pm PST
As a reminder, the following video by Lora Staples could help with vibrato:

http://www.virtualsheetmusic.com/experts/lora/vibrato/
Fabrizio Ferrari - moderator and CEO, on February 26, 2014 @4:15 pm PST
Dear Linda and Charlie, I think Prof. Fitzpatrick must have missed Charlie's question. I have just sent him a reminder, so I am sure he'll jump into the conversion right away. Thanks for your comments!
Linda Reinhart on February 26, 2014 @6:55 pm PST
Thanks, Fabrizio. That and bowing are my current focus toward playing more beautifully.
Linda
Fabrizio Ferrari - moderator and CEO, on February 27, 2014 @10:41 am PST
You are very welcome! Please, feel always free to post any questions or suggestions you may have. We'll be always delighted to hear from you. Thanks!
Charlie Corbin * VSM MEMBER * on February 27, 2014 @12:19 pm PST
Thanks to all. Fabrizio's referral to Lora's video was huge. It is an excellent video. I learned a lot already and can see I have a lot of work ahead of me. I also look forward eagerly to William's next series. Thanks again.
Fabrizio Ferrari - moderator and CEO, on February 27, 2014 @2:44 pm PST
You are very welcome Charlie! And I am very glad to know you found Lora's video so useful, that's great news. Yes, stay tuned because I know William is working on very exciting videos... by the way, if you have any specific requests such as a specific video about any specific topic, piece, etc, please post your requests on these comments. We are here listening! Have a great day :)
Chen, Yiu-sion * VSM MEMBER * on January 21, 2014 @3:23 pm PST
Hello! Professor ,
May I ask how to practice the upstroke and downstroke staccato? Thanks!
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William - host, on January 22, 2014 @9:52 am PST
Hi! The simplest way is through your scales. As we do 1 note to a bow, 2 notes, 3 notes, etc... use this organization to practice up and down bow staccatos.
Emad Yousif on January 8, 2014 @11:35 am PST
Dear Mr Fitzpatrick
I play the violin even though Im a late starter I have a question about the flagoöler and I wish if I crrosspond with you through e mails.
Best Rgards
Emad Jamil
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William - host, on January 9, 2014 @9:56 am PST
Hi! Would love to answer your question but unfortunately I am currently unable to answer questions via email, but again I would be very happy to answer any questions here on the site.
Heidi Kath, Australia * VSM MEMBER * on January 5, 2014 @9:00 pm PST
Hello Professor,
Very enlightening, your teaching about pressure points on the bow for different techniques, and now after all this time of playing I have to revise old habits. What about Bach, do the same rules apply, and could you please advise me what sort of bowing would I use for the Double - Presto, of his Partita Nr.1.
Thanking you,
Heidi Kath, Australia.
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William - host, on January 9, 2014 @10:37 am PST
Hi! There are 2 ways that come to mind for this passage. One would be starting on an up bow which would lead you to the middle of the bow with a brush stroke (ie.Tip——< >——Frog) or down bow, starting from the middle of the bow, which would lead you to the upper third of the bow (ie.Tip—< >———Frog) and would be clearly on the string. As for the question about Bach in general it really depends on the passage. I hope this answers your questions.
Heidrun Kath * VSM MEMBER * on January 11, 2014 @4:13 am PST
Thank you, Professor. As a final comment, would I be correct to observe that using 2nd and 3rd finger as pressure point considerably frees up your wrist.
Regards,
Heidi Kath.
jon zekas * VSM MEMBER * on January 5, 2014 @12:07 pm PST
What is function of the pinky in Sautille, Spiccato, or legato bowing? How do you cooordinate the left hand fingers so it can keep up with the Sautille bowing? Many thanks for this very informative video.
axel on January 2, 2014 @7:56 am PST
very generous for such expert instruction thankyou
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William - host, on January 2, 2014 @10:22 am PST
Thank you!
Kathleen Barry * VSM MEMBER * on January 2, 2014 @2:17 am PST
You are calling the index finger #2? I thought we are taught that it is called the first finger.
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William - host, on January 2, 2014 @10:24 am PST
Hi! The index is 1, have I inadvertently misled?
Fabrizio Ferrari - moderator and CEO, on January 2, 2014 @10:36 am PST
Thank you Kathleen for your feedback. Could you please tell us in which video did you find that? I can't find what you have mentioned in this specific video (Bow Strokes video), everything William says looks correct to me. I look forward to hearing from you. Thanks!
Kathleen Barry * VSM MEMBER * on January 2, 2014 @12:03 pm PST
I listened to him again and I see he said the middle two fingers play legato - so there is where I heard reference to the 2nd finger. I misheard him. His voice goes very quiet when he answers his question: "so I use #1 & 2"; or "I use 2 & 3". My mistake, tho. Thank you.
Fabrizio Ferrari - moderator and CEO, on January 2, 2014 @3:16 pm PST
Thank you Kathleen for clarifying, I am glad to know the video is correct. Please, feel always free to contact us with any questions or requests you may have, we will be glad to hear from you. Thank you again for your kind feedback!
Tosh * VSM MEMBER * on January 1, 2014 @5:42 pm PST
Thanks...a better and clearer explanation than what can be found in Carl Flesch's Art of Violin Playing, volume 1.
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William - host, on January 2, 2014 @10:25 am PST
Thank you!
Patricia * VSM MEMBER * on January 1, 2014 @2:31 pm PST
Dear Professor Fitzpatrick:

Thank you so much for your instructions in Sautille, Spiccato and other bow strokes. I can see now that there is a substantial difference and not only because of the speed. As soon as my fingers remember the notes in Seitz concerto without errors, I would like to play the passage with a Sautille bow stroke and this video will be next to me during my violin practice(s).

Just to confirm my understanding:
For Sautille and Legato, the pressure point is on the two middle fingers, this is finger 2 and 3.
For Martele and Staccato the pressure point are on finger 1 (index) and finger 3.
For Spiccato, I am not sure if the pressure point are on fingers 1 and 3 or fingers 2 and 3.

Oh!!! Oh! I was so excited with the video that I almost forgot to wish you and Fabrizio, a happy and prosperous 2014.

Thanks again to both of you. What a nice way to start 2014.

Patricia
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Fabrizio Ferrari - moderator and CEO, on January 1, 2014 @5:41 pm PST
Thank you very much Patricia, appreciated! Have a great 2014 you too!
William - host, on January 2, 2014 @10:26 am PST
Hi! "For Spiccato, I am not sure if the pressure point are on fingers 1 and 3 or fingers 2 and 3. " Its is 2 and 3. Thanks!
Gwen Daly * VSM MEMBER * on January 1, 2014 @2:10 pm PST
I listened to your video again..Thanks so much.
Sautille and Spiccato use pressure from fingers 2 and 3.
Correct??
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William - host, on January 2, 2014 @10:26 am PST
Hi and yes!
David Naff * VSM MEMBER * on January 1, 2014 @9:49 am PST
Thank you for this video. This is the first I have heard about the change in pressure by using different fingers and love the sound that is attained by doing so. I wanted to confirm that for sautille and spiccato you are using the same fingers as you use for the legato. Thanks again for these excellent points.
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William - host, on January 1, 2014 @11:25 am PST
Yes! And the speed of the passage will determine which stroke is the most appropriate!
Gwen Daly * VSM MEMBER * on January 1, 2014 @8:36 am PST
Thank you....I am wondering if I have this straight.
Sautille pressure points are fingers 1 and 3
Spiccato pressure points are fingers 2 and 3
Or are they both 2 and ?
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William - host, on January 1, 2014 @11:24 am PST
Hi! Sautille, Spicatto and legato are 2-3 and Stacatto is 1-3!
Marta * VSM MEMBER * on January 1, 2014 @6:50 am PST
Thank you so much for the clarifications! I've learned a lot from your demonstrations. This may be a silly question, but how do I know when to use these specific bow techniques?
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William - host, on January 1, 2014 @11:27 am PST
Hi! No question is silly!!! The notation and character of the music will aid you in determining when a certain stroke is required. Hope that this is helpful.
Don Summers * VSM MEMBER * on January 1, 2014 @5:52 am PST
Amazingly educational , clear , and informative. Helps take the mystery out of how the different bowing techniques are achieved.
As a 64 year old 2nd year violin student, bowing technique is what I find most challenging and least understood or taught.
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William - host, on January 1, 2014 @11:22 am PST
Very happy that it was helpful!
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