Todd Ehle - advanced violin expert
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Questions/Comments/Requests:

Lina on March 7, 2014 @10:35 am PST
Can you give me a tip for studiyng the mendelssohn violin concerto´s cadenza. I have problems with my bowl. I really don´t know how to fix the clarity of the notes and sound. Sorry my english i am Colombian.
anna funes on December 9, 2013 @1:52 pm PST
can you do a video on corelli's la folia. I'm having trouble with the runs.
Jackie * VSM MEMBER * on October 9, 2013 @9:48 am PST
Occasionally I get a whistle when I play an open E string. This usually happens when I am playing something such as a scale going up on the A string into an open E string. How can I eliminate the whistle? I am an experienced player and use what I believe are very good strings.
reply
Todd Ehle - host, on October 9, 2013 @2:45 pm PST
Hi Jackie, I remember one of my teachers, Catherine Tait, addressing this very issue. She said that if a whistling E occurred on a string crossing, you could plan for it by pulling the bow slightly further in towards your body as you string cross, so that the bow is not actually parallel to the bridge when you first begin the note. You'll need to straighten it out instantly after the note begins, but this should help get rid of the whistle. Give it a try and good luck!
mariano * VSM MEMBER * on September 8, 2013 @1:53 pm PST
I wish to learn the bach prelude in E major solo violin perhaps bwv 1006 with clear and slow movement so i can follow/learn it.
reply
Todd Ehle - host, on September 11, 2013 @8:44 am PST
Hi Mariano, that's a great movement from a great work. It will probably have to be the new VSM teacher to help you through it, but it's an ideal selection for a video. Best of luck to you!
J Smith on August 7, 2013 @8:18 am PST
Sometimes my bow slips and I don't know why. I am an experienced player (20+ years). My violin teacher checked my
bow hold and says its fine. She told me sometime my vibrato will
cause my violin to move too much. But I have watched for this and
can't always blame it on my finger vibrato. any suggestions?
thanks
reply
Todd Ehle - host, on September 11, 2013 @8:48 am PST
Hi J. Smith, I have seen tremendous improvement when a student just stares at the contact point (bow to string) while playing. That monitoring of the contact point gives instant feedback to your brain and often resolves the problem. Do this every day for several minutes and you should be able to develop a "feel" that will start to carry over to all your playing. Best of luck!
Hank Schutz * VSM MEMBER * on June 12, 2013 @7:02 am PST
In the Preludio to Bach's E Major Partita III, do the note stem directions in measures 13-28 always indicate that a note with upward stem is played on the open E string? Does convention require that each pair of notes be on different strings? Suggested fingering (in general)?
Patricia * VSM MEMBER * on May 9, 2013 @7:46 am PST
Dear Professor Ehle:

Probably you are tired of hearing this, but I must let you know that you have no idea how respected and appreciated you are all over the planet earth. This is reflected in the face of violin’s students when one of us mentions your name. Thank you.

My question refers to Artificial Harmonics 2-octave higher than the note pressed with your index on the same string. From your video #55, I would like to confirm with you if my understanding about the distance between index and pinky gradually getting smaller in high positions, is correct. Do you always touch the string with the fleshy part of your pinky, exactly four (4) notes higher from the index and no matter in which position you are? For example:
--3rd position, A-string with index pressing over the D-note. Should my pinky be touching slightly over the G-note?
--4th position, A-string with index pressing over the E-note. Should my pinky be touching slightly over the A-note?
--7th position, A-string with index pressing over the A-note. Should my pinky be touching slightly over the D-note?

If I am wrong, kindly let me know over which note the pinky should be able to find the harmonic in each of the abovementioned situations (2P8 above D-E-A notes). This way I can have a clue to find others 2-octave harmonics.

Waiting for your reply, I remain cordially yours.

Patricia
reply
Todd - host, on May 10, 2013 @11:21 am PST
Hi Patricia, First off, let me thank you for your incredibly nice compliment, I appreciate your kindness. As for your questions; yes is the correct answer to all. It is also accurate that the distance gets smaller as you work up the fingerboard, but all notes become closer as we travel towards the bridge. Notice that in every example you gave me, all are four note-names apart. This is the interval of a 4th, also known as a Perfect 4th. D-G, E-A, A-D. Good luck with your artificial harmonics, Patricia!
Debra Moore on April 10, 2013 @7:40 am PST
There is a left hand issue I have not seen addressed - perhaps more specifically for recording situations. That would be releasing pressure on the finger before moving to the next note or changing position. With today's recording techniques you can really hear how that can lead to pitch issues, in that the note you are leaving goes slightly flat at the end of the note. Have you dealt with this specifically?
reply
Todd Ehle - host, on September 11, 2013 @8:53 am PST
Hi Debra, sorry I missed your comment. I must say that I have not given this issue much thought. I will throw out the idea that if you vibrate through a note, the pitch is bending the whole time.. I will look for examples of this though and get back to you if/when I find them. Thanks for taking the time to comment and best regards.
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